probiotics

Addicted to Fitness Show Notes – Raw Water Debate & Dietary Migraine Triggers

Good day! Thanks for joining us for this week’s show recap. Hopefully, you’ve already listened to this week’s episode in which Nick and I talk about a new health trend that’s been popping up, as well as food triggers for a fairly common ailment.

Before we get into that though, we do a quick training recap.

My training recap is pretty concise – a whole lot of nothing. Yup, nada, squat, zilch, zippo. It’s temporary as we make our little munchkin our priority. She brings her own set of physical demands though!

Nick, on the other hand, has been doing some new and exciting fitness activities, specifically taking a TRX training course at Better Everyday in Orlando, FL with Master TRX instructor Trevor Anderson. What is TRX? Well, it’s a brand that’s most well-known for selling suspension training equipment. Though Nick has been familiar with the training, this was his first course on the subject. He learned the TRX foundational movements (plank (primary), push, pull, squat, lunge & rotation), proper equipment setup, numerous exercises and progressions for clients’ workout.

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Now for the real meat of the podcast…

I’ve been hearing rumbles about a health trend in a number of places, especially social media. On this episode of ATF, we’re digging in and learning about whether there’s anything legit to the trend of Raw Water.

Raw water is defined as, “crystal clear water, brimming with beneficial bacteria & minerals from the earth.”

Sound appealing?

I was extremely annoyed with this idea, but Nick went even farther and described the whole thing as very dangerous. Why?

The article gets into it a bit more, but in short, water filtration is a positive development for our country for a reason. Pollution and the natural, harmful, bacteria in various bodies of water, make drinking unpurified water, basically, stupid.

I invite you to remember playing the popular computer video game from the 1980s, the Oregon Trail. How many times did your little pioneer family get sick and die from dysentery? That is one of the possible consequences of drinking unpurified water. As Nick reminded me, believe it or not, dirty water kills thousands of children every day (source).

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Approximately 37 million people in the U.S. suffer from migraines (source)

Our second main point of discussion is migraines – oh those dastardly headaches (though they include a lot more than an aching head in many instances).

Migraines are something a significant portion of American suffer from. I even get a few a year, usually brought on by stress. In addition to stress, hormones and diet have been cited as probable triggers for migraines.

Nick discovered an article on Healthline.com that discussed dietary triggers & treatments for migraines. Several dietary triggers for migraines include:

  • Coffee (any caffeinated beverage)
  • Aged Cheese
  • Alcohol
  • Processed meat

If you’re evaluating your diets and starting to worry, be sure to take a closer look at that article for additional details. Then, take comfort, as there are also some dietary treatments/supplements:

  • Butterbur (herbal supplement)
  • Coenzyme Q10
  • Folate
  • Magnesium
  • Riboflavin

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Don’t forget to visit our ATF Podcast Facebook page for exclusive content and please give us a rating & review in iTunes if you haven’t done so already.

Also, be sure to take advantage of the awesome 20% off promo code (“ATF”) from our sponsors, The Hemp Coffee Exchange, so you can stock up on some tasty, and nutritious, coffee – just the ticket for kicking off 2018.

Links for this week’s episode

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/addicted-to-fitness-podcast/id1121420986?mt=2&i=1000399875722

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/nick-burch-702220833/raw-water-dietary-migraine

Website: http://addictedtofitness.libsyn.com/raw-water-dietary-migraine-triggers

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Addicted To Fitness Show Notes – Leaky Gut & The Benefits of Probiotics

Welcome back! This week’s show notes are brought to you by Shannon…

Both Nick and I had training updates for the first time in a bit (I have been a bit lighter on the training as of late).

I am slowly getting back into adding some activity, but am holding off on real training since my doctor mandated I not do any strenuous exercise for at least six weeks after childbirth. So I’ve been settling for daily walks with our dog and the baby, as well as some “slow flow” yoga, both of which are still making me sweat.

I’ve been super excited to get back to a prior-to-childbirth workout routine, especially since I’m getting back to regular clothes (no more maternity clothes!).

Meanwhile, Nick has been spending more time at home with the baby, which means he’s doing more at-home workouts. He puts them on his Instagram Stories, so be sure to follow @ETTampa and check them out! He’s also been getting some training leading the classes at Title Boxing, since he has to demonstrate the whole workout versus simply coaching like he does for personal training. He now teaches three classes a week (at noon, Monday-Wednesday).

In addition to the training, Nick has also made the decision to clean up his diet by focusing on nutrition. Diet has been a challenge for both of us since childcare has really minimized the amount of time we have to prepare food.

Whether we have time or not, we’re always fascinated with nutrition. One topic we wanted to get more in-depth on was one we have mentioned previously – leaky gut.

So what is it? Leaky gut is simply defined as increased gastrointestinal permeability. It’s commonly a symptom of conditions like Celiac and Crohn’s disease.  Interestingly enough, though it’s a term that is used more often these days, many medical sites and professionals reporting on this “condition” also call out that it is not one that can be diagnosed accurately.

Even medical celebrities like Dr. Oz are somewhat skeptical of the cause/origin of leaky gut, mostly since it’s not yet been determined whether it is the cause of other conditions/illnesses, or simply a side effect/symptom of something more serious.

Some research states that inflammatory foods (e.g. refined sugar & carbs, fast food, etc) may damage the function of the small intestine and thereby allow undesirable substances such as bacteria, viruses, un-digested food particles, and waste products to leak into blood stream. Nick mentioned a podcast episode by past ATF guest, Vinnie Tortorich, which discussed a recent study on the damaging effects fast food specifically can have on an individual’s gut health.

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Symptoms often associated with leaky gut include: bloating, cramps, fatigue, food sensitivity, achy joints, rashes – which are also symptoms for many other conditions.

The book, Practical Paleo claims that grains and seeds are the primary inflammatory foods, calling them anti-nutrients. Since many of our feel-good hormones and antibodies ( e.g. serotonin) are produced in our gut, it’s critical to focus on gut health. The best course of treatment for leaky gut is eliminating inflammatory foods from your diet for 30, 60, 90 days or longer. Practical Paleo offered up details on how to repair leaky gut, summarized nicely in one page (see above).

One of the ways to repair, the book calls out, is by taking probiotics. And this leads us to our discussion on the power of probiotics.

One of the few supplements we both take on daily basis are probiotics daily. Probiotics are the good bacteria that help keep the bad bacteria in check and maintain gut health.

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Recently Nick saw a study by ATF favorite, Dr. Rhonda Patrick (find her on YouTube, Twitter and Instagram @foundmyfitness), who also just had a baby, about the effect probiotics have on breast milk. The study found that mothers who take probiotics during the time they’re breastfeeding produce milk that seems to improve gastrointestinal functional symptoms and decrease incidence of infantile colic and regurgitation in their infants.

So we looked further into what the best probiotic foods are, as supplements are not the only place to find this gut-health-helpers. Healthline.com highlights the “Top 11 Probiotic Foods,” which includes some of our favorites like pickles, kimchi, sauerkraut and yogurt. Check the full list here.

We finish our chat with a friendly reminder; don’t forget that antibiotics can kill beneficial probiotics in your gut in addition to the bad ones, so be sure you take a medicinal dose of probiotics after you finish your antibiotics to restore your supply.

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That’s it for this week’s episode!

Don’t forget to like & follow the Addicted to Fitness podcast page on Facebook, give us a rating & review in iTunes and please take advantage of your 20% off discount on coffee from our new sponsors, The Hemp & Coffee Exchange, at hempcoffeeexchange.com.

Learn more about our sponsors in our previous ATF episode where we interview the founders and taste test this delicious coffee here.

Links to this week’s episode

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/leaky-gut-the-benefits-of-probiotics/id1121420986?i=1000393875009&mt=2

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/nick-burch-702220833/leaky-gut-the-benefits-of

Website: http://addictedtofitness.libsyn.com/leaky-gut-the-benefits-of-probiotics

What’s on the Menu – Expiration dates need not apply

I’m a huge Anthony Bourdain fan. I know I’ve said it before, but he is my man crush. He’s a badass chef, a killer writer and trains jiu-jitsu nonstop. Besides the decades of substance abuse, I’d definitely want to be him if I could switch bodies for a day. One of the main reason I want Bourdain’s life is he gets to travel the world and eat unique and sometimes unusual cuisine. One such trip, which was documented on this CNN show Parts Unknown, took him to Denmark and the “science bunker” of the often #1 rated restaurant in the world, Noma. There he got to taste numerous food items in various stages of fermentation. Fortunately for us, we don’t have to travel to Denmark to reap the benefits of fermented foods.

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Inside the Noma Science Bunker (pic courtesy of eater.com)

Fermented foods are all the rage nowadays. You can find them at grocery stores, farmers markets and juice bars. You can even find them at baseball stadiums. You may have several fermented foods in your fridge and not even know it. Common fermented foods include: yogurt, miso, sauerkraut, natto and kimchi, which is today’s menu spotlight.

The nutritional value of the vegetables used to make Kimchi are actually enhanced due to the fermentation process. The primary bacteria responsible for Kimchi’s fermentation, Lactobacillus plantarum, not only increases the numerous vitamins and minerals contained in the vegetables, it also increases important bioactive compounds like thiocyanate and glucosinolate. These compounds have been linked to possible treatments for various health conditions such as cancer, obesity and atherosclerosis just to name a few. Kimchi also happens to be a natural probiotic that promotes proper gut health (source). Sounds like a miracle food right? I think it is and what’s even more amazing is that you can make this miracle food at home for next to nothing.

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Making homemade kimchi is so ridiculously easy that I’m pissed at myself that I haven’t done it yet. The only supplies you’ll probably need to invest in are several glass mason jars with screw on lids. Other than that it’s just vegetables and spices. Check out the video below to see how easy it is to prepare (sorry for the commerical).

If you already make your own homemade kimchi, let us know about your recipe. We’d love to share a pic of your delicious fermented veggies on our social media channels. Feel free to send any and all feedback to elementaltampa@gmail.com or reach out to us on social media. We’re not afraid to “fanboy” over the greatness of kimchi in a public forum.

What’s on the Menu – Kombucha: Legit Elixir or Placebo Soda?

I truly believe that we can heal ourselves of common ailments (colds, acne, obesity, etc.) with proper diet and exercise. That doesn’t mean that I think all prescription medication is poison. There are certain conditions that require a trip to a medical professional and a necessary prescription. However, the over prescription of certain drugs can and has led to further health concerns like antibiotic resistant bacteria. That’s why we need to learn about possible natural remedies that allow us to heal ourselves, instead of always relying on our pharmacist. One particular natural remedy has been receiving a lot of pub lately about its numerous health benefits, but conflicting reports make me wonder if it’s really the “miracle drink” people claim it is.

Kombucha is a fermented beverage often referred to as “living tea.” It is made by combining sugar and tea leaves with a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast known as SCOBY. The final product is a slightly fizzy, sour beverage that claims to boost your immune system, help with digestion, provide energy and even mitigate serious health conditions like cancer.

Kombucha

Mother Kombucha is available throughout Florida

I’m a big proponent of probiotics. I guess you could say I’m pro-pro (rim shot). The benefits of probiotics range from better gut health to improved mood (source link). The fact that kombucha is full of these probiotics, along with other beneficial micronutrients, is why advocates believe it will cure what ails you. There has been some recent scientific studies that backup certain health benefits of kombucha like its antidiabetic (source link) and antioxidant (source link) effect, but almost all these studies were performed on non-human subjects. Critics have stated that a lack of research on human subjects negate a lot of kombucha’s supposed health benefits. They also state that kombucha prepared in unsanitary conditions could result in the consumption of deadly bacteria (source link).

I researched “deaths due to kombucha consumption” and was unable to find any cases in which drinking kombucha was directly responsible and only one case where it was believed to be a contributing factor (source link). It’s true due to the presence of active bacteria cultures, drinking kombucha does present some level of risk, but so does buying bagged spinach. Foodborne illnesses are an issue we need to be aware of. However, it shouldn’t prevent us from consuming items that provide certain health benefits. Kombucha has been consumed for centuries for a reason. I believe that the “living tea” does provide certain health benefits, but it should be enjoyed in moderation and by those with non-compromised immune systems. Also, if you do buy it, makes sure you research the producer. I’m sure where and how the kombucha is made can have an effect on its purity.

Are you a kombucha fan? If so, let us know about your favorite brand. Feel free to send pics of you drinking your favorite kombucha to elementaltampa@gmail.com. We’d also happily accept any feedback from any kombucha naysayers.