bacteria

Addicted to Fitness Show Notes – Raw Water Debate & Dietary Migraine Triggers

Good day! Thanks for joining us for this week’s show recap. Hopefully, you’ve already listened to this week’s episode in which Nick and I talk about a new health trend that’s been popping up, as well as food triggers for a fairly common ailment.

Before we get into that though, we do a quick training recap.

My training recap is pretty concise – a whole lot of nothing. Yup, nada, squat, zilch, zippo. It’s temporary as we make our little munchkin our priority. She brings her own set of physical demands though!

Nick, on the other hand, has been doing some new and exciting fitness activities, specifically taking a TRX training course at Better Everyday in Orlando, FL with Master TRX instructor Trevor Anderson. What is TRX? Well, it’s a brand that’s most well-known for selling suspension training equipment. Though Nick has been familiar with the training, this was his first course on the subject. He learned the TRX foundational movements (plank (primary), push, pull, squat, lunge & rotation), proper equipment setup, numerous exercises and progressions for clients’ workout.

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Now for the real meat of the podcast…

I’ve been hearing rumbles about a health trend in a number of places, especially social media. On this episode of ATF, we’re digging in and learning about whether there’s anything legit to the trend of Raw Water.

Raw water is defined as, “crystal clear water, brimming with beneficial bacteria & minerals from the earth.”

Sound appealing?

I was extremely annoyed with this idea, but Nick went even farther and described the whole thing as very dangerous. Why?

The article gets into it a bit more, but in short, water filtration is a positive development for our country for a reason. Pollution and the natural, harmful, bacteria in various bodies of water, make drinking unpurified water, basically, stupid.

I invite you to remember playing the popular computer video game from the 1980s, the Oregon Trail. How many times did your little pioneer family get sick and die from dysentery? That is one of the possible consequences of drinking unpurified water. As Nick reminded me, believe it or not, dirty water kills thousands of children every day (source).

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Approximately 37 million people in the U.S. suffer from migraines (source)

Our second main point of discussion is migraines – oh those dastardly headaches (though they include a lot more than an aching head in many instances).

Migraines are something a significant portion of American suffer from. I even get a few a year, usually brought on by stress. In addition to stress, hormones and diet have been cited as probable triggers for migraines.

Nick discovered an article on Healthline.com that discussed dietary triggers & treatments for migraines. Several dietary triggers for migraines include:

  • Coffee (any caffeinated beverage)
  • Aged Cheese
  • Alcohol
  • Processed meat

If you’re evaluating your diets and starting to worry, be sure to take a closer look at that article for additional details. Then, take comfort, as there are also some dietary treatments/supplements:

  • Butterbur (herbal supplement)
  • Coenzyme Q10
  • Folate
  • Magnesium
  • Riboflavin

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Don’t forget to visit our ATF Podcast Facebook page for exclusive content and please give us a rating & review in iTunes if you haven’t done so already.

Also, be sure to take advantage of the awesome 20% off promo code (“ATF”) from our sponsors, The Hemp Coffee Exchange, so you can stock up on some tasty, and nutritious, coffee – just the ticket for kicking off 2018.

Links for this week’s episode

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/addicted-to-fitness-podcast/id1121420986?mt=2&i=1000399875722

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/nick-burch-702220833/raw-water-dietary-migraine

Website: http://addictedtofitness.libsyn.com/raw-water-dietary-migraine-triggers

What’s on the Menu – Kombucha: Legit Elixir or Placebo Soda?

I truly believe that we can heal ourselves of common ailments (colds, acne, obesity, etc.) with proper diet and exercise. That doesn’t mean that I think all prescription medication is poison. There are certain conditions that require a trip to a medical professional and a necessary prescription. However, the over prescription of certain drugs can and has led to further health concerns like antibiotic resistant bacteria. That’s why we need to learn about possible natural remedies that allow us to heal ourselves, instead of always relying on our pharmacist. One particular natural remedy has been receiving a lot of pub lately about its numerous health benefits, but conflicting reports make me wonder if it’s really the “miracle drink” people claim it is.

Kombucha is a fermented beverage often referred to as “living tea.” It is made by combining sugar and tea leaves with a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast known as SCOBY. The final product is a slightly fizzy, sour beverage that claims to boost your immune system, help with digestion, provide energy and even mitigate serious health conditions like cancer.

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Mother Kombucha is available throughout Florida

I’m a big proponent of probiotics. I guess you could say I’m pro-pro (rim shot). The benefits of probiotics range from better gut health to improved mood (source link). The fact that kombucha is full of these probiotics, along with other beneficial micronutrients, is why advocates believe it will cure what ails you. There has been some recent scientific studies that backup certain health benefits of kombucha like its antidiabetic (source link) and antioxidant (source link) effect, but almost all these studies were performed on non-human subjects. Critics have stated that a lack of research on human subjects negate a lot of kombucha’s supposed health benefits. They also state that kombucha prepared in unsanitary conditions could result in the consumption of deadly bacteria (source link).

I researched “deaths due to kombucha consumption” and was unable to find any cases in which drinking kombucha was directly responsible and only one case where it was believed to be a contributing factor (source link). It’s true due to the presence of active bacteria cultures, drinking kombucha does present some level of risk, but so does buying bagged spinach. Foodborne illnesses are an issue we need to be aware of. However, it shouldn’t prevent us from consuming items that provide certain health benefits. Kombucha has been consumed for centuries for a reason. I believe that the “living tea” does provide certain health benefits, but it should be enjoyed in moderation and by those with non-compromised immune systems. Also, if you do buy it, makes sure you research the producer. I’m sure where and how the kombucha is made can have an effect on its purity.

Are you a kombucha fan? If so, let us know about your favorite brand. Feel free to send pics of you drinking your favorite kombucha to elementaltampa@gmail.com. We’d also happily accept any feedback from any kombucha naysayers.