cancer

What’s on the Menu Could Help You Complete Your Weekend Workout

I have a lot of hidden talents, but one I’m ready to admit to today may leave some of you scratching your heads.

I’m a Scent DJ.

You read that right, a Scent DJ.

I discovered this talent recently while Shannon was in labor at the hospital. We brought our essential oil diffuser with the hope of creating a more relaxed atmosphere during labor, delivery and recovery. During the 3 days that we were there, we received multiple compliments and inquires about the scents I was using. I was a maestro of the essential oils and that’s when Shannon bestowed me with the title of Scent DJ, which is also known in the professional world as an aromatherapist.

pexels-photo-208504

The broad definition of aromatherapy is the use of aroma to enhance the feeling of well-being. As unusual as it may sound, the use of specific scents is one of the oldest forms of medicine. Over time, people have discovered that certain scents help treat certain ailments and/or enhance specific bodily functions.

Rosemary oil is a scent I “spin” on a regular basis and the potential health benefits it can provide should have you running to your nearest apothecary store. Below is a short list of potential benefits associated with using rosemary oil

  • Cancer fighting abilities: rosemary oil contains a chemical called carnosol, which studies have shown selectively kills cancer cells while leaving non-cancer cells unharmed (source)
  • Prevents hair loss: a 2015 study demonstrated that rosemary oil was as effective as the active ingredient in Rogaine in protecting against hair loss in patients with androgenetic alopecia (source)
  • Improves cognitive function: a 2012 study documented that test subjects displayed improved performance, speed and accuracy on cognitive tests when exposed to rosemary oil aroma (source)

Screenshot 2017-11-11 at 7.39.50 AM

One such cognitive function that can be enhanced by rosemary oil aroma is exercise, which is why I strongly encourage you to fill your nostrils with the scent of rosemary before you perform this boxing centric weekend workout.

Head to the ETT YouTube channel (link) if you need further instruction on the jab + power hook and/or power uppercut + lead hook hand combinations. I recommend performing the workout in interval format (30 sec work/30 sec rest) for 12-20 minutes. Don’t forget to warmup and modify the workout to match your fitness level.

If you complete this or any weekend workout, please let us know in the comment section below OR send us a pic/video of you doing the workout on social media (FacebookInstagram or Twitter). ENJOY!

ETT 10-21 Weekend Workout (6)

Advertisements

Addicted to Fitness Show Notes – Apple Watch Review & Childhood Obesity

Welcome back!

Nick and I have been making progress on our training, bit by bit. We kick off this week’s podcast episode with a recap on what we’ve been doing.

Nick has been finding his Title Boxing classes to be a built in workout, which has been good since time between work and parenting has been somewhat limited.

He also gets into what he’s doing in his diet – intermittent fasting (phase two – which includes a 10 hour eating window and 14 hour fast). He’s already lost five pounds, which he wasn’t expecting, thinking he didn’t have that much weight to loose.  The point was never to loose weight, but rather to attempt to eliminate precursors of detrimental health conditions like insulin resistance and cancer. You can read more about his previous blog post on intermittent fasting and its benefits here.

I meanwhile, have been focusing on childcare, which is a workout in itself, but have already dropped over 20 pounds off my pregnancy weight (mostly due to breastfeeding). My available time to workout is about 30 minutes, so whatever I choose to do (Peloton bike or yoga usually) must fit in that window.

IMG_5690

We’re big fans of our Peloton Cycle

My cardio is the area that I have seen the most need for improvement. My goal for training has not been to loose weight though, but rather just to continue to combat postpartum anxiety and depression.

Our first main topic of the episode is a review of the new Series 3 of the Apple Watch.

podcast pic 11-6

Now, if you’ve been listening for a while, you might recall my review of the Fitbit Charge 2 earlier this year (listen to that ATF episode here) in which I stated that it was a test on whether I would like a fitness tracker and heart rate monitor at all. I wasn’t ready at that time to invest in anything more.

Well, I decided recently that I was ready for a smart watch, as the actual watch functionality was something that I really missed. With the latest release of the Apple Watch, Series 3, I felt it was finally time to make the move.

So first, a quick introduction to what I got!

I purchased the Series 3 – 38MM Apple Watch with GPS and the gold aluminum case, along with the Pink Sand Sport Band.

apple & Apple

The specs include:

  • Gold aluminum case
  • Built-in GPS and GLONASS
  • Faster dual-core processor
  • W2 chip
  • Barometric altimeter
  • Capacity 8GB1
  • Heart rate sensor
  • Accelerometer and gyroscope
  • Water resistant 50 meters
  • Ion-X strengthened glass
  • Composite back
  • Wi-Fi (802.11b/g/n 2.4GHz)
  • Bluetooth 4.2
  • Up to 18 hours of battery life
  • watchOS 4
In terms of the look and comfort, the 38mm size is great for my wrist size, as is the band, which fits even my smaller wrists surprisingly well. Plus the band is made of high performance fluoroelastomer that will stand up to my heavier use. The ability to customize the look by switching out the bands is the icing on the cake!
One of the best parts of this watch, is the watch face/s. Not only do they actually show up when I look at my watch (the Fitbit was not as sensitive) but the multiple, customizable faces that you can switch between and manage on your iPhone via the Apple Watch app, are crystal clear and very convenient.
Another key strength of this device is the integration with the iPhone, which is truly amazing. Everything is customized and controlled/setup through the iPhone via an app. It even has some of the same functionality (flashlight, talk to text, Siri, reminders, sound controls, etc.) to the iPhone.
Some of my favorite apps/programs include:
  • Heart Rate Monitor is pretty accurate and can run ongoing or in the background, depending how you’re using it (will drain battery life if using it to track an activity).
  • Activity – Set goals and get reminders. All of which integrate into the Health App on your iPhone
  • Workout – Quickly select a workout for tracking purposes. All metrics integrate into the Health App on your iPhone
  • Weather – Pretty straight forward, but seeing it on your watch at a glance is remarkably helpful
  • Timer & Stop Watch – Again, straight forward, but handy for a variety of instances
  • Maps – Would probably be good when you’re walking around and need to find something. Just takes a little time to get the directions on your watch.
  • Messages – Not particularly health focused, but is a simplified version of the Messages app in your phone. The talk-to-type tech is surprisingly accurate and makes it all that much easier to respond to texts without having to get your phone.
Finally, the magnetic charger sits in my bathroom and is super easy to lay the watch on. The fact it’s the basic charging cube cord makes it easy to interchange with other cords in my house (which are everywhere since we have so many apple products!).
The popularity of the Apple Watch means it’s been appearing on the wrists of people of all ages, including teens and kids! The question of whether these younger age groups are truly using these gadgets for fitness is somewhat questionable given our next topic… childhood obesity rates.
Nick came across this article in Time magazine recently that cited a study in a medical periodical, about how the BMI (ratio of weight & height) indicates that childhood obesity has risen 10 times worldwide over the last 40 years. [Insert gasp here]
The study reported dramatic increases in childhood obesity in African and Asian countries especially, which have historically had low obesity rates. This was a surprise to us. Additionally, in several countries where childhood obesity rates were already high (including the U.S.), the rates have plateaued, however, the researchers believe it is more due to coincidence and not policy action.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A related article Nick recently saw from the Washington Post (link) stated non-alcohol-related fatty liver disease (cirrhosis of the liver) is the fastest growing reason for liver transplants among young adults in the U.S.. This disease can be caused by obesity, hypertension and diabetes (i.e. high intake of sugar and grains IMO). One researcher in the article stated that they had a patient develop this condition at age 13.

It should be noted that the number of liver transplants due to non-alcohol related cirrhosis is small, but what is alarming is the dramatic increase in its prevalence over the last 10 years.

All in all, it’s an alarming study, reinforcing how important food and health education is among our youth!

As we wrap up, we encourage you to please visit our sponsor hempcoffeeexchange.com and use the code ‘ATF’ to get 20% off at checkout!

Reach out to us on social media (FacebookInstagram or Twitter) or send us and email at elementaltampa@gmail.com.

Links to this week’s episode

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/apple-watch-review-a-childhood-obesity/id1121420986?i=1000394456914&mt=2

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/nick-burch-702220833/apple-watch-review-a-childhood

Website: http://addictedtofitness.libsyn.com/apple-watch-review-a-childhood-obesity

What’s On The Menu is this Weekend’s Workout

I didn’t get my weekly “What’s on the Menu” post done for its normal Thursday post date, but I still wanted to share it with you. Read about my experience with intermittent fasting then enjoy another effective weekend workout.

I was first introduced to the idea of fasting during my formative years in Catholic elementary school. Every Friday during Lent (the 40 days leading up to Easter), all Catholics were encouraged to fast during the day and then finish the day with a “meatless” dinner. Thankfully the Bible didn’t consider seafood meat, which meant I enjoyed a lot of McDonald’s fish sandwiches and pizza for dinner during Lent.

I’ll admit that my dedication to daylight fasting during Lent was spotty at best and, as devoted to Catholicism as my parents were and still are, they didn’t send my brother and I to school without lunches.  I was extremely grateful to them at the time, but with what I know now, periodic fasting could have been extremely beneficial.

The origins of fasting date back to ancient Greece and it’s inclusion in numerous religious doctrine make it one of the oldest weight loss/control methods. Even though its been used for several millennia, the extent of fasting’s metabolic benefits are just starting to be discovered (source).

One of my go-to sources for the latest health research, Dr. Rhoda Patrick, has been promoting the benefits of intermittent fasting, which she refers to as time restricted eating, for some time now. The basic concept is that you have an eating window everyday that syncs up to your natural circadian rhythm. The research suggests that the most metabolic benefits occur with a eating window of no more than 12 hours and, unlike my Lenten fasts, occurs during the day (source).

Studies have shown that adherence to this way of eating may save you from a number of the leading causes of death. Several recent discoveries about the death-defying benefits of intermittent fasting include:

  • Every other day fasting found to reduce obesity and insulin resistance by changing gut bacteria (source)
  • An 11-hour eating window associated with a significant reduction in breast cancer risk & reduction in recurrence (source)
  • Frequent fasting has been shown to reduce the insulin-like grown factor 1 (IGF1) which has been show to proliferate the growth of cancer cells (source)

Screenshot 2017-11-04 at 8.16.10 AM

I’ve been partaking in time restricted eating for the past 3 weeks and I’ll admit it’s pretty tough for someone like me. I have a very active job and some days I leave the house before 7am and don’t return till 8pm. Thankfully I’ve been very good at packing a lunch full of nutritious and satiating foods that help me get enough fuel in during my eating window.

Even though I started my current intermittent fasting plan with no desire to lose weight, I’ve lost nearly 5 lbs in 3 weeks. I know that doesn’t sound like a lot but when you’re 5’11” and 160, losing 5 lbs without really trying is pretty significant. As great as the weight loss is, I’m more excited by the possibility that this way of eating can help me prolong my life.

Another way to prolong your life is with regular exercise, which is why you should try the weekend workout featured below. This workout includes several variations of one of the most beneficial exercise there is, the squat.

Squats are considered a compound exercise, which means they are multi-joint movements that require the use of various muscle groups. Try to knockout these various forms of the squat and make sure you let us know in the comment section below or on social media (FacebookInstagram or Twitter) how you feel the next day. Don’t forget to warmup and modify the workout to match your fitness level. ENJOY!

ETT 10-21 Weekend Workout (4).png

What’s on the Menu – How Fat Can Be Your Friend

When celebrity fitness trainer Vinnie Tortorich came on the Addicted to Fitness podcast (click here to listen to entire episode) last year, he made a statement that really resonated with me. He said

The worse thing about dietary fat is that it’s called FAT!

That one statement inspired me to look into the low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) lifestyle to determine if it suited me better than the not so low carb lifestyle I was participating in at the time. After subtracting certain items that contain refined carbs from my diet and adding more items that were high in healthy fats, I started feeling fuller, longer and was no longer hangry two hours after a meal.

There is one particular “fatty” food item that has been a part of my diet well before my shift to LCHF. I’ve been hearing about its health benefits for well over a decade and its versatility has made it a staple in Shannon and I’s kitchen. It can be used as a cooking oil, salad dressing, finishing sauce and even a skin care product. The multi-talented food item I’m referring to is olive oil and it’s this week’s menu spotlight.

Olive oil is a broad category of oil made from pressed olives. I realize that isn’t “breaking news,” but I wanted to mention that because the different types of olive oils at the supermarket can be quite overwhelming. If you’re looking for the variety that provides the most health benefits, you’ll want to stick with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Any other variety may use solvents to extract the oil or partially consist of cheaper, inflammatory oils.

Even though EVOO, purchased from a reputable producer, doesn’t contain any protein or carbs, it’s still highly nutritious. One hundred grams, which is about 7 tablespoons, of EVOO contains 72% of our recommended daily allowance (RDA) for Vitamin E and 75% of our RDA for Vitamin K (source), both of which can contribute to preventing cardiovascular disease. The micronutrients contained in olive oil are impressive but it’s the type of fat it contains that really sets it apart from other cooking oils.

EVOO consists primarily of monounsaturated fat. This type of fat is more heat-resistant, which means it is less likely to oxidize when used in cooking applications. This is one aspect of EVOO that makes it superior to other cooking oils like canola or even flax-seed, which consist primarily of polyunsaturated fat. Less oxidation means less free radical production, which can cause inflammation that may researchers believe is responsible for chronic health conditions like atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s and cancer. Oh, and EVOO contains a ton of anti-inflammatory phenols and polyphenols to further combat those previously mention conditions (source).

Screenshot 2017-10-19 at 10.04.32 AM

As you can imagine, I frequently use EVOO to saute veggies and as my go-to salad dressing (2 parts EVOO + 1 part vinegar). I also use it to make my baked sweet potatoes fries nice & crispy, add extra flavor to my fried eggs and add even more monounsaturated fat to my daily avocado snack.

I mentioned it quickly earlier in this post, but it is very important that you purchase your EVOO from a reputable producer to get the optimum amount of health benefits. There are two great books, Extra Virginity Real Food / Fake Food, that describe some of the deception associated with olive oil.

A couple quite tips I’ll give you in regards to purchasing EVOO are buy imported and make sure the container it comes in is NOT clear (light can cause oxidation over time). If you have a brand of EVOO that you swear by, I’d love to hear about it. Feel free to share it with us via email (elementaltampa@gmail.com) or snap a pic of the bottle and share it on our social channels (FacebookInstagram or Twitter) and don’t forget FAT DOESN’T MAKE YOU FAT!

What’s on the Menu – The Best Smelling Health Food There Is

Most foods produce a distinct smell while cooking, but there is only a select few that elicit the “that smells awesome’ response from me while being prepared. The items that bring my olfactory senses to their figurative knees include:

  • Bacon: I know vegans that even enjoy the smell of cured pork bellies.
  • Coffee: Shannon didn’t drink caffeinated coffee while pregnant, but she loved smelling the beans.
  • Bread: We have a Cuban bakery in our neighborhood that makes me want to go on a carb binge every time I drive by.
  • Shallots: Doesn’t matter what meal is being prepared. If shallots are being used, I’m salivating and THAT’S one of the reasons why they are today’s menu spotlight.

Shallots belong to the Allium genus of vegetables, which also includes onions, leeks, garlic, etc. I’ve already declared my love for garlic in a previous menu spotlight (click here to check it out), and I often cook garlic & shallots together to double up on the mouth-watering aroma. As much as I would like Yankee Candle to carry a shallot scented candle, its perfume isn’t the main reason I love it so much.

Screenshot 2017-10-05 at 2.37.13 PM

By weight, shallots contain more vitamins and minerals than its larger cousin the onion. Approximately one cup of shallots contains a significant amount of our recommended daily allowance (RDA) of Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, copper and iron. They also contain more antioxidants, by weight, than any other Allium vegetable (source). Research suggests that one particular antioxidant possessed by shallots can mitigate the damaging effects of several chronic health conditions.

When you chop or crush a shallot, you cause an enzymatic reaction that produces the sulfur containing antioxidant known as allicin. In specific scientific studies (source), this antioxidant has been shown to:

  • Reduce cholesterol.
  • Combat viral, bacterial and fungal infections.
  • Lower blood pressure.
  • Protect against certain forms of cancer.
  • Regulate blood sugar levels in diabetics.

Who would have thought that the onion mini-me would possess so many health benefits. Honestly, shallots taste & smell so good that I’d still use them even if they didn’t have all the health benefits.

Shallot pic

One recipe I frequently add shallots to is my breakfast bowl (pictured above). Besides shallots, the breakfast bowl includes dark leafy greens (spinach, kale, chard, etc.), mushrooms, mini sweet peppers, several eggs and diced tomatoes. I make sure to chop my shallots first because more allicin is produced the longer a chopped/crushed shallot goes uncooked. Next, I saute the mushrooms and peppers till soft (3-5 minutes), chop up a few tomatoes in the meantime, then throw in the greens & shallots for about a minute till the greens wilt.

Using the same pan I cooked the veggies, I fry up several over easy eggs in coconut oil. After the eggs are done, I slid them onto the cooked veggies, add the tomatoes & crushed red pepper and VOILA! Breakfast, lunch or dinner of champions.

If you’re a frequent shallot user, I’d love to hear about which dishes you add them to. Send your favorite recipe that features shallots to elementaltampa@gmail.com or reach out to us on social media (FacebookInstagram or Twitter).  I don’t think it will be better than my breakfast bowl, but there’s no shame in being runner-up.

 

What’s on the Menu – Let’s Talk Turkey

I may be guilty of propagating a myth about one of our nation’s founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin. In the Instagram post (link) promoting this week’s menu spotlight, I suggested that the wild turkey was in a race with the bald eagle to be on our nation’s seal.

I recall hearing that historical tidbit from a reliable source and when I went to find supporting research, I found a source that seemed to confirm my statement. Upon further research, it appears the idea of Franklin championing for the wild turkey to be our nation’s symbol way back in the 18th century isn’t entirely true.

According to excerpts from a letter authored by Franklin, he did believe that the wild turkey was a “bird of courage” more likely to chase off an intruder than the bald eagle, but did NOT suggest that the turkey should be a part of our nation’s seal. It appears that Franklin was somewhat apathetic to the idea of having a bird on our nation’s seal altogether (source). Regardless of the turkey’s moral character, the fact that it provides both significant macro & micronutrients is 100% accurate.

wild-turkeys-2080364_1920 (1)

You won’t find these types of turkeys at your grocery store

The turkey you pick up at the grocery store looks very different from the turkeys Benjamin Franklin was talking about. They may look different but their macronutrient content is very similar. Three ounces of turkey breast, without skin, contain 2 grams (g) of fat, 0 g of carbs and 26 g of protein (source). Not a great source of healthy fat or carbs, but a definite protein powerhouse. No surprise that you find turkey on a lot of meal plans for individuals looking to put on muscle.

Much like other animal-based protein sources, turkey is high in B vitamins, B3 & B6 in particular. B3, also known as niacin, is critical for the conversion of dietary macronutrients into usable energy including the production of glycogen. For those unfamiliar with glycogen, it is an animal starch stored in our muscles as fuel for future physical activity (source). This particular function of B3 is most likely why bodybuilders ingest supplemental forms of it to help them maintain their rigorous workout schedule.

Turkey also contains a significant amount of important dietary minerals. Zinc, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, and iron are several minerals you’ll absorb eating turkey, but the mineral most abundant in turkey is selenium. A 4oz serving of turkey contains 62% of our DV of selenium, which is known to be a powerful antioxidant. With that said, it should come as no surprise that the consumption of turkey, and other poultry, has been shown to reduce the risk conditions/syndromes caused by oxidative stress like pancreatic cancer (source).

Screenshot 2017-08-24 at 10.28.29 AM

Turkey doesn’t contain the amount of fat I normally prefer in my animal protein, but that’s an easy problem to fix. Shannon and I love using ground turkey (which does have added fat) to make burgers and I throw a couple slices of avocado on them to up their fat content. The combination of the protein from the turkey and the fat from the avocado makes for one satiating meal.

If you have a go-to turkey recipe that you think trumps my turkey burgers, please feel free to share it on our social media channels (FacebookInstagram or Twitter). You can also email it to us at elementaltampa@gmail.com.

Email is the best way to find out more about Elemental Training Tampa’s online training program. Get that personal training you’ve always wanted at a price that you can afford.

What’s On The Menu – Let’s Ketchup on this Micronutrient Superfruit

I apologize for the brevity of this post. I had a full blog written, with funny anecdotes and informative nutrition details about this week’s menu spotlight. Bbbbbbbuttttt, when I woke up yesterday morning to do the final edit, I discovered that I didn’t save it.

pexels-photo-52608

My reaction when I realize I didn’t save this week’s blog

I don’t want to leave you all hanging this week, so the following is a short summary of why you need to start incorporating more tomatoes & tomato products, besides ketchup, into your diet.

  • Tomatoes’ macronutrient content isn’t anything spectacular – 1 medium size tomato contains no fat, 1 gram (g) of protein and 5 g of carbs; its carbs consist of mainly simple sugars & insoluble fiber (source).
  • Tomatoes’ micronutrient content is what really sets them apart – they contain a significant amount of vitamins (C, K & B-complex), minerals (molybdenum, potassium & copper) and antioxidants (lycopene, rutin, beta cartoene & many more – source).
  • The consumption of the micronutrients contained in tomatoes has been shown to mitigate certain health conditions – The vitamins, minerals and antioxidants contained in tomatoes have been shown to help with the treatment of high blood pressure, heart disease, degenerative vision conditions, depression and more (source). Lycopene, which tomatoes contain a significant amount of, has been shown in epidemiological & animal studies to lower the risk of certain types of cancer (source).
  • Shannon makes the best tomato dish EVA! –  Some may say this is an opinion, but if you’ve had Shannon’s Saucy Tomato Eggs, you would know it’s a fact. Do yourself a favor and click here to check out the recipe.

Screenshot 2017-08-16 at 3.56.43 PM

Hopefully the wizards at WordPress can work some magic and recover the previous blog. If they do, I’ll update this one with any additional info.

In the meantime, please feel free to send us your favorite tomato recipes. Doesn’t matter if you like’em raw, stewed or smashed into a paste, send those recipes to us at elementaltampa@gmail.com. You can also send us pics of your go-to tomato dishes on social media (FacebookInstagram or Twitter).  Shannon and I will pick the most tasty looking one and repost it on all our channels.

What’s On The Menu – The Whole Food That Gets Invited to Every Party

If you’re one of the 11 people on the planet that haven’t heard the go-to mushroom joke, here you go

Q: Why did the mushroom get invited to all the parties?

A: Because he’s a FUN-GI!

Allow me to explain why that joke is somewhat comical for those who may not understand. Even though you find mushrooms in the produce section of the grocery store, they aren’t technically vegetables. They actually belong to a group more closely related to humans than plants known as the FUNGI (pronounced fun-guy) kingdom (source).

Let me know when you stop laughing?

Screenshot 2017-07-27 at 5.45.31 PM.png

Image courtesy of suttons.co.uk

Now that you’ve had your chuckles, I want to enlighten you on the serious health benefits mushrooms can provide. One cup of raw white button mushrooms (pictured above) contains ~1 gram (g) of fat, 2 g of carbs and 3 grams of protein. You should also be aware that different varieties of mushrooms can provide different amounts of micro & macronutrients. For example, while white button mushrooms only have 3 g of protein per cup, large portabella mushrooms contain 5 g per cup (source). Not a tremendous difference but definitely important to individuals who are looking for more non-animal protein sources.

Mushrooms are certainly a great low-carb addition to any meal, but I believe the real benefits lie in their micronutrients. They contain a significant amount of vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid) and B9 (folate). B vitamins play a major role in our energy levels and red blood cell formation, but they’re also important for brain health and fetal development (source).

Mushrooms are also the only non-animal, non-fortified source of vitamin D. This is a big reason why mushrooms are a frequent component of the vegan diet. The best dietary sources of vitamin D usually come from the animal kingdom OR processed foods enriched with vitamins and minerals (source). The naturally occurring vitamin D in mushrooms is important to several bodily functions & systems, but recent research suggest that its biggest benefit may be cancer prevention.

screenshot-2017-07-27-at-6-34-10-pm.png

The results of two separate studies, one published in 2015 and the other published this year, suggested that specific varieties of mushrooms demonstrated the ability to suppress the genetic markers associated with certain types of cancer (source). I don’t care how funny they are, mushroom’s ability to fight off the Big C is a much better reason to have them at your next party.

That’s a call back people.

Speaking of calls. You should schedule a Skype call with yours truly to discuss your current health & fitness plan. I’d love to provided you with tips on exercise, nutrition or accountability. All you have to do is send me an email at elementaltampa@gmail.com. You can also email us your delicious mushroom recipes or share a pic of your favorite mushrooms dish on our social channels (FacebookInstagram or Twitter).