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Addicted To Fitness Show Notes – Leaky Gut & The Benefits of Probiotics

Welcome back! This week’s show notes are brought to you by Shannon…

Both Nick and I had training updates for the first time in a bit (I have been a bit lighter on the training as of late).

I am slowly getting back into adding some activity, but am holding off on real training since my doctor mandated I not do any strenuous exercise for at least six weeks after childbirth. So I’ve been settling for daily walks with our dog and the baby, as well as some “slow flow” yoga, both of which are still making me sweat.

I’ve been super excited to get back to a prior-to-childbirth workout routine, especially since I’m getting back to regular clothes (no more maternity clothes!).

Meanwhile, Nick has been spending more time at home with the baby, which means he’s doing more at-home workouts. He puts them on his Instagram Stories, so be sure to follow @ETTampa and check them out! He’s also been getting some training leading the classes at Title Boxing, since he has to demonstrate the whole workout versus simply coaching like he does for personal training. He now teaches three classes a week (at noon, Monday-Wednesday).

In addition to the training, Nick has also made the decision to clean up his diet by focusing on nutrition. Diet has been a challenge for both of us since childcare has really minimized the amount of time we have to prepare food.

Whether we have time or not, we’re always fascinated with nutrition. One topic we wanted to get more in-depth on was one we have mentioned previously – leaky gut.

So what is it? Leaky gut is simply defined as increased gastrointestinal permeability. It’s commonly a symptom of conditions like Celiac and Crohn’s disease.  Interestingly enough, though it’s a term that is used more often these days, many medical sites and professionals reporting on this “condition” also call out that it is not one that can be diagnosed accurately.

Even medical celebrities like Dr. Oz are somewhat skeptical of the cause/origin of leaky gut, mostly since it’s not yet been determined whether it is the cause of other conditions/illnesses, or simply a side effect/symptom of something more serious.

Some research states that inflammatory foods (e.g. refined sugar & carbs, fast food, etc) may damage the function of the small intestine and thereby allow undesirable substances such as bacteria, viruses, un-digested food particles, and waste products to leak into blood stream. Nick mentioned a podcast episode by past ATF guest, Vinnie Tortorich, which discussed a recent study on the damaging effects fast food specifically can have on an individual’s gut health.

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Symptoms often associated with leaky gut include: bloating, cramps, fatigue, food sensitivity, achy joints, rashes – which are also symptoms for many other conditions.

The book, Practical Paleo claims that grains and seeds are the primary inflammatory foods, calling them anti-nutrients. Since many of our feel-good hormones and antibodies ( e.g. serotonin) are produced in our gut, it’s critical to focus on gut health. The best course of treatment for leaky gut is eliminating inflammatory foods from your diet for 30, 60, 90 days or longer. Practical Paleo offered up details on how to repair leaky gut, summarized nicely in one page (see above).

One of the ways to repair, the book calls out, is by taking probiotics. And this leads us to our discussion on the power of probiotics.

One of the few supplements we both take on daily basis are probiotics daily. Probiotics are the good bacteria that help keep the bad bacteria in check and maintain gut health.

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Recently Nick saw a study by ATF favorite, Dr. Rhonda Patrick (find her on YouTube, Twitter and Instagram @foundmyfitness), who also just had a baby, about the effect probiotics have on breast milk. The study found that mothers who take probiotics during the time they’re breastfeeding produce milk that seems to improve gastrointestinal functional symptoms and decrease incidence of infantile colic and regurgitation in their infants.

So we looked further into what the best probiotic foods are, as supplements are not the only place to find this gut-health-helpers. Healthline.com highlights the “Top 11 Probiotic Foods,” which includes some of our favorites like pickles, kimchi, sauerkraut and yogurt. Check the full list here.

We finish our chat with a friendly reminder; don’t forget that antibiotics can kill beneficial probiotics in your gut in addition to the bad ones, so be sure you take a medicinal dose of probiotics after you finish your antibiotics to restore your supply.

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That’s it for this week’s episode!

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Links to this week’s episode

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/leaky-gut-the-benefits-of-probiotics/id1121420986?i=1000393875009&mt=2

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/nick-burch-702220833/leaky-gut-the-benefits-of

Website: http://addictedtofitness.libsyn.com/leaky-gut-the-benefits-of-probiotics

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